“Blik’s creativity has been both prodigious and profoundly moving. His huge bronze figures typically emerge from black metallic masses like butterflies from cocoons and stretch upwards, their fingers often just touching some mysterious shining object above them. You don’t have to be an art critic to grasp the metaphor. This might be the artist emerging from his dark past. Or perhaps it is the indomitable human spirit rising from apparent devastation to reach for the beauty that will not be crushed.” (Richard Morrison, The Times 2005)

 

To understand Maurice Blik’s sculpture, one must understand his unique childhood, which set him on his path to becoming an internationally renowned sculptor. A survivor of the Holocaust, he has overcome the traumas of his early life and focused his energy on creating sculptures that evoke movement, freedom and life.

 

Maurice Blik was born to Jewish parents in Amsterdam in 1939, during the Second World War. In 1943, at the age of four, Blik’s father was sent to Auschwitz, while Blik, his sister pregnant mother and grandmother were sent to the notorious Bergen Belsen concentration camp. Blik experienced a lifetime of unimaginable tragedy and horrors until being liberated with his mother and oldest sister in 1945 by the Cossacks.

 

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